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HHS Final Rule on Reducing Health Care Disparities

MCN Question of the Week

HHS Final Rule on Reducing Health Care Disparities

QUESTION:

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHA) recently issued a final rule to reduce health care disparities.  Can you provide a brief summary of this final rule?

ANSWER:

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a final rule to advance health equity and reduce health care disparities on May 18, 2016. Under the rule, individuals are protected from discrimination in health care on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability and sex, including discrimination based on pregnancy, gender identity and sex stereotyping. This final rule is effective as of July 18, 2016.

In addition to implementing Section 1557’s prohibition on sex discrimination, the final rule also enhances language assistance for people with limited English proficiency and helps to ensure effective communication for individuals with disabilities.

The Nondiscrimination in Health Programs and Activities final rule implements Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act, which is the first federal civil rights law to broadly prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded health programs, such as hospitals that accept Medicare or doctors who participate in the Medicaid program. Previously, civil rights laws enforced by HHS’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) broadly barred discrimination based only on race, color, national origin, disability, or age.  The final rule is intended to aid consumers who are seeking to understand their rights and clarifies the responsibilities of health care providers and insurers that receive federal funds.

The final rule prohibits sex discrimination in health care including:

  • Requiring that women must be treated equally with men in the health care they receive.  Other provisions of the ACA bar certain types of sex discrimination in insurance, for example by prohibiting women from being charged more than men for coverage.  Under Section 1557, women are protected from discrimination not only in the health coverage they obtain but in the health services they seek from providers.
  • Prohibiting denial of health care or health coverage based on an individual’s sex, including discrimination based on pregnancy, gender identity, and sex stereotyping.

The final rule also includes important protections for individuals with disabilities and enhances language assistance for people with limited English proficiency including:

  • Requiring covered entities to make electronic information and newly constructed or altered facilities accessible to individuals with disabilities and to provide appropriate auxiliary aids and services for individuals with disabilities.
  • Requiring covered entities to take reasonable steps to provide meaningful access to individuals with limited English proficiency.  Covered entities are also encouraged to develop language access plans.

While the final rule does not resolve whether discrimination on the basis of an individual’s sexual orientation status alone is a form of sex discrimination under Section 1557, the rule makes clear that OCR will evaluate complaints that allege sex discrimination related to an individual’s sexual orientation to determine if they involve the sorts of stereotyping that can be addressed under 1557. HHS supports prohibiting sexual orientation discrimination as a matter of policy and will continue to monitor legal developments on this issue.

The final rule states that where application of any requirement of the rule would violate applicable Federal statutes protecting religious freedom and conscience, that application will not be required.

Related Products from MCN Healthcare

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